Gear Horse Care Other

Horse Trailer Weights by the Numbers (77 Types & Models)

horse-trailer-weight-2
Written by Horse Rookie

How much does a horse trailer weigh on average? This rookie wondered, too.

Unlike many of my fellow Montanans, I didn’t grow up on a ranch. I didn’t start driving tractors or hauling trailers as a teenager, and I couldn’t have picked a “bumper pull” out of a lineup to save my life. When I set out to buy my first horse trailer in my 30s, I had a lot to learn. Near the top of the list? What does a horse trailer weigh, and why does it matter — a lot.

(Note: Cherry Hill’s easy reference book Trailering Your Horse: A Visual Guide to Safe Training and Traveling is “trailer-made” for rookies!)

Horse trailer weight depends on several factors, including whether it’s a bumper pull or gooseneck, has a dressing room and/or tack room, is made of steel, aluminum, or hybrid materials, and how many horses it fits. Generally speaking:

  • 2-horse bumper pull trailers weigh 2,400-3,200 lbs (empty).
  • 2-horse gooseneck trailers weigh approximately 3,700-4,700 lbs (empty).
  • 3-horse trailers weigh closer to 2,800-3,900 lbs (empty). 
  • 3-horse gooseneck trailers weigh 4,000-5,600 lbs (empty).
  • 4-horse gooseneck trailers weigh 4,200-8,400 lbs (empty).

(Keep reading for a breakdown of 77 popular horse trailer weights by brand/model.)

Even once I had those basics, I still needed to understand what all the numbers meant and how they added up to safely hauling my pride and joy (AQHA gelding Monkey).

Not only was I concerned about his safety and mine on the road, I needed to make sure my ‘rig’ would be safe for the other drivers around us.

Article Quick Links hide

Be sure to also check out our Ultimate Packing & Horse Trailering Checklist before you hit the road.

Pulling Your Weight: A Winning Formula

As Tom Scheve, CoFounder of EquiSpirit Trailer Company, writes in The Complete Guide to Buying, Maintaining, and Servicing a Horse Trailer, “You’d be surprised at how many [people] buy a tow vehicle first only to find out later that it won’t do the job.” Yikes.

Think about your hauling setup in this order:

  1. Horse First: It’s critical to know the type, size, and habits of the horse(s) you’ll be hauling first. Buying an expensive truck and trailer only to discover it won’t comfortably haul your specific load is a real #rookiemistake.
  2. Trailer Second: Once you know what you’ll be hauling, narrow down trailers with the right height/width, layout, and materials to suit your needs.
  3. Tow Vehicle Third: After you identify your trailer, it’s time to get a tow vehicle that can safely pull that exact trailer (with a nice buffer).

Following this advice, I’m now the happy owner of a Trails West Adventure MX two-horse bumper pull trailer and a GMC Sierra 2500 tow vehicle.

This article walks you through what you need to know about how trailer weight impacts your “rig equation.”

(Note: Cherry Hill’s easy reference book Trailering Your Horse: A Visual Guide to Safe Training and Traveling is “trailer-made” for rookies!)

horse-trailer-weight-3

 Here’s the Trails West 2-horse bumper pull trailer I bought (and love).

Return to top

Learn the Lingo: Trailer Weight Terminology

  • Ball Mount: This is the mount with your hitch ball that slides into your mounted hitch frame (attached with a pin). Your ball mount will also have a weight rating on it.
  • CGVWR (GCVWR): The Combined Gross Vehicle Weight Rating is the maximum allowed weight (per the tow vehicle manufacturer) for a loaded trailer and loaded tow vehicle together.
  • Curb Weight: How much your trailer weighs empty (includes your spare tire, mats, etc.).
  • DOT: Department of Transportation
  • GAWR: The Gross Axle Weight Rating is how much weight your specific axle can handle safely. (Horse trailers usually have two axles.)
  • GVW (GW): How much your trailer weighs when fully loaded (e.g. horses, water tank, spare tire, hay, tack, mats).
  • GVWR: The Gross Vehicle Weight Rating should be listed on your vehicle title and on the actual trailer (usually on a sticker inside the door frame). This is the most your loaded trailer can weigh and still be towed safely. According to EquiSpirit, GVWR = both axle weight ratings + tongue weight.
  • Hitch Ball: Your hitch ball has its own rating, and it should be equal to or greater than the tow capacity of the tow vehicle (EquiSpirit).
  • Rig: In the horse world, a rig refers to the combination of your trailer and towing vehicle.
  • Tongue Weight: This is the weight of the trailer at the coupler when the trailer sits level on its axles.
  • Tow Capacity: The amount of weight a vehicle can safely tow according to the manufacturer.
  • Weight Distribution System: This system distributes tongue weight to all your tow vehicle wheels and the trailer (e.g. weight distribution bars).

Return to top

How Horse Trailer Weight is Measured

Now that you can talk the talk, it’s time to understand how horse trailer weight is actually measured.

The simplest number to be aware of is your trailer’s curb weight, or how many pounds your trailer weighs empty. (Note: Spare tire and mats are often included in this number.) This gives you a great baseline at the start of your research for just how heavy your trailer is on its own.

Remember, a published curb weight on a manufacturer’s website won’t include any extra options you might add like extra length or height. So make sure you take these into account.

horse trailer parked

It’s important to understand how weight affects your ride.

But, how often are you going to be hauling an empty trailer? You also need to know what it weighs fully loaded. That’s where the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) comes into play.

Think of this as the max your trailer can weight when everything is inside–horses, tack, hay, etc.

***NEVER load your trailer heavier than the GVWR.***

Unfortunately, the GVWR often isn’t listed on trailer manufacturer websites so you may have to email or call them to ask about a particular model.

How to Weigh Your Horse Trailer

When we need to weigh ourselves, we hop on a scale. Weighing your horse trailer is no different. (OK, the scale is a lot bigger.)

If you want to double-check your curb weight and/or loaded weight, find your nearest truck weigh station. Gravel yards, truck stops, and garbage dumps are your best bets.

For just a couple bucks, they’ll help you weigh your rig (trailer, truck, or both) and provide a weight certificate. Double-D Trailers has a nice illustrated guide here.

(Highway weigh stations geared toward big rig truckers may not be happy to see you if they’re really busy.)

Check out our article about Trailering a Horse for the First Time if you’re new to hauling your equine partner.

Return to top

Why Horse Trailer Weight Matters (A LOT)

Now you know what all the lingo means and how to figure out what your trailer weights. But why does it matter so much? Can’t you simply hook up any ‘ol pickup truck, toss your horse in the trailer, and hit the open road?

Heck no.

Properly matching your trailer and tow vehicle is CRITICAL FOR SAFETY. Inadequate tow vehicle, improper hitch setups, and “negligence of the numbers” is an accident waiting to happen.

horse-trailer-weight-matters

Make sure your vehicle and trailer are a good match.

online horse courses

Safety First

Every time you pull onto the road, other drivers rely on you to have the right equipment and know how to safely pull your load. So do passengers in your own vehicle and your friends and family more broadly.

Haul safely. Arrive safely.

Speaking of safety, make sure your trailer is equipped with safety horse ties and that your horse wears appropriate shipping boots and a safety halter when traveling.

Learn more about how to safely tie a horse in a trailer.

Keep It Legal

Another reason the numbers are so important is that your state may require your trailer to be registered by weight (unladen and/or GVWR). If your rig is heavier than the registered weight, expect a hefty ticket.

Play the Long Game

The last thing you want to do is invest in a nice truck and trailer only to have it deteriorate quickly from undue wear and tear.

Remember these points:

  • The goal is for your tow vehicle to perform equally well alone as when you’re hauling your trailer. If your vehicle really struggles to do the job, that’s a very bad sign.
  • Pulling a horse trailer puts major stress on your tow vehicle.
  • A trailer that’s too heavy for your vehicle will degrade your brakes, steering, hitch setup, tires, axles, and more.
  • If you’ll be hauling in the mountains or other rough terrain, you especially want to have a safe buffer for your GVWR. Just because you squeak in under the limits on flat roads doesn’t mean that’ll be the case once you hit steep mountain passes–up or down.
  • Long-term engine damage shortens the life of your tow vehicle #andthesethingsaintcheap. A hitch cover and trailer cover are great investments to keep your trailer in top shape.

Check out our Ultimate Packing & Horse Trailering Checklist before you hit the road.

Return to top

Choosing a Tow Vehicle

horse-trailer-tow-vehicle

Here’s the tow vehicle I bought for my 2H bumper pull

As I mentioned up top, you should only choose a tow vehicle after you know what your horse(s) needs and after you choose your trailer. That way you can be sure your vehicle is equipped to handle the load.

Once you have your trailer picked out, you’ll have the GVWR number at your fingertips. That’s what you’ll take the dealership when you look at tow vehicles because your trailer should never weigh more than that number when fully loaded. Plus, since you’ll likely never come very close to hitting the GVWR even when loaded, you’ll have some buffer for shifting horses, etc.

It’s crucial that your tow vehicle has the power and size to pull your load–and pull it efficiently.When it comes to gooseneck horse trailers, the weight requires a full-size truck tow vehicle. However, the rules get a bit more grey when it comes to smaller and lighter bumper pulls.

horse-trailer-weight-match

Only a few SUV-type vehicles are safely equipped to haul horses.

There are some Suburban-esque and sport utility vehicles that may be able to handle a smaller bumper pull, but DO YOUR HOMEWORK.

Oftentimes factory installed hitches may need special stabilizer bars in order to pull a trailer, and an auto/manual transmission can impact tow capabilities too.

Get into the weeds with the folks at your dealership, even if you’re pretty sure you know your way around the lot. Many vehicles appear similar on the outside but have significantly different tow capacities.

Request the manufacturer’s vehicle towing guide to check your math before making any decision.

Remember: Vehicle tow capacity factors in engine size, transmission, and axle ratio.

Hitch Class Ratings

If you’re not an auto mechanic, things like hitch class ratings can be pretty confusing. (I certainly didn’t learn this stuff in business school.)

Regardless of your tow vehicle, you must make sure your hitch is properly rated to pull your exact trailer–and pull it level. Here are some tips:

  • Hitch parts (e.g. ball, slide-in ball, ball mount) must equal or exceed your hitch rating.
    Check your hitch for two stickers (on hitch and on ball mount) to ensure they’re rated for your specific trailer tongue weight.
  • Your weight carrying rating tells you how much weight your hitch can handle without weight distribution bars.
  • The weight distribution rating will be much higher, as it’s the weight your hitch can handle with weight distribution bars.
  • If you need more tow capacity, you *may* be able to add a weight distribution system to increase your hitch rating. Consult an expert first.
  • Vehicles with a shorter wheelbase should always have weight distribution bars.

If this still sounds like a foreign language, simply ask for help at the horse trailer dealership. They can point you in the right direction and tell you exactly what you need. (That’s what I did! It’s better to look like a rookie than haul unsafely.)

online horse courses

Horse Trailer Tongue Weight

If you’re a horse trailer rookie like me, you should also learn the basics of tongue weight. Basically, tongue weight is how much your trailer weighs if you were to walk up to the front and lifted the front end yourself. (Don’t actually try that by the way.)

Remember that weight will be a lot heavier once your trailer is fully loaded.

horse-trailer-weight-tongue

Every trailer is different. Know yours inside and out!

Goosenecks and bumper pulls have a tongue weight, and it’s important that your tow vehicle is properly matched to handle it. According to Double-D Trailers, bumper pull tongue weight “is typically between 10-20% of the empty trailer gross weight. On a gooseneck trailer, the tongue weight is typically around 22%.”

Sadly, a lot of manufacturer sites don’t list the tongue weight capacity. Be sure to do your homework before committing to a tow vehicle.

Here’s a cool online calculator for tongue weight

Check out our beginners guide to Trailering a Horse for the First Time (without having a full-blown panic attack).

Return to top

Common Horse Trailer Types

Bumper Pull Trailer (“Tag Along”)

bumper pull horse trailer

Bumper pull horse trailer

A bumper pull or tag along trailer hooks to your tow vehicle using a hitch near the back bumper (but it’s attached to the vehicle frame, not the bumper itself).

This is what most #horserookies buy if they only need to haul one or two horses (sometimes three).

They can be pushed around by wind and horse movement more easily, and they’re harder to back than gooseneck trailers. But, if you’re looking for a great starter trailer a bumper pull should be on your list. (I bought a Trails West Adventure MX two-horse bumper pull and love it!)

Gooseneck Trailer

horse-trailer-weight-roadside

Gooseneck horse trailer

A gooseneck trailer is only pulled by pickup trucks, as the hitch is actually inside the bed of the truck. They’re usually easier to pull in wind and less impacted by horse movement, but they’re also heavier and more expensive than bumper pulls.

If you’re pulling three or more horses, you’ll probably want a gooseneck.

Stock Trailer

Stock trailers, or livestock trailers, are exactly what they sound like. They’re built to haul livestock like cattle and horses, so they’re more… rugged and minimal. (No fancy dressing rooms, tack rooms, or padded dividers here!)

horse-trailer-weight-stock

Stock horse trailer

Instead of a slant or straight load horse trailer, stock trailers are big open boxes without (usually) any dividers. Occasionally you’ll see a divider in the front that creates a separate box stall. My friend has that setup, and it was great when I hauled Monkey with her horses because he could stay separate.

The sides are open, making these trailers brighter and letting more air flow through than trailers with windows.

However, many stock trailers have a lower ceiling because they’re designed for cattle vs. horses. If you’ve got a tall horse, think again.

online horse courses

Horse Box

horse box

Horse box

You’ll rarely (if ever) see a horse box in the United States, though I personally wish they were more available here. A horse box is typically a European version of a horse trailer that combines the tow vehicle and the trailer into one unit. (It’s also called a Horse Van or a Lorry.)

You don’t have to learn how to back up differently because it’s just like driving a car!

Horse Float

If you hear the term “horse float,” that simply refers to a horse trailer. In Australia, they call them horse floats instead.

Return to top

New to hauling? Learn how in our blog You CAN Do This: Trailering a Horse for the First Time.

Common Horse Trailer Materials

Many horse trailers are made of steel.

Steel

Many horse trailers (especially stock trailers) are made from steel–or at least have a steel frame. People love steel because of its strength and ability to take a beating without becoming brittle.

It’s also less expensive than many other materials, which impacts your wallet in a nice way.

One downside is that steel can rust, which is why many horse trailers now use galvanized steel (rust resistant). Another downside is weight, as steel is quite heavy.

Aluminum

In an attempt to find a better option than steel, there was an uptick in aluminum horse trailers from companies like Featherlite.

Aluminum is lighter and doesn’t rust, but there are several downsides you should be aware of:

  • Aluminum isn’t nearly as strong as steel. To achieve the same strength, aluminum needs to be three times at thick. (Note: That’s why aluminum trailers may not end up being that much lighter than steel ones.)
  • Aluminum is a heat conductor so your trailer (and your horses) will get hotter faster.
  • Aluminum can be brittle, dent, shear, and tear, meaning your trailer life may decrease.
  • Welding aluminum is more difficult than repairing steel.
  • Aluminum is expensive.
online horse courses

Hybrids

Some horse trailers now combine the best of each material, using steel for things like frames and chassis and things like fiberglass or aluminum for the exterior.

Galvanized steel, powder-coated steel, and other technologies are becoming more popular–those hybrid materials are more expensive than all steel trailers.

Check out our Can’t-Live-Without Horse Supplies for all the essentials.

Return to top

Bumper Pull Horse Trailer Weight

If you’re ready to (bumper) pull your weight,* here are some basic guidelines for weights from Double-D Trailers.

This can vary a lot based on different brands and models (as you’ll see below), but it’ll give you a general sense of curb weights in the bumper pull category.

  • 2 Horse without a dressing room (2,400 lbs)
  • 2 Horse with a dressing room (3,200 lbs)
  • 3 Horse with a dressing room (4,100 lbs)

*Sorry, couldn’t help myself.

DISCLAIMER: The information below comes from manufacturer websites, and you’ll see not all of them list each number. Contact them directly to fill in the gaps if you need additional data. Also remember these numbers may change as they come out with new models or make improvements. Check with them to ensure you have the latest figures.

1-Horse Trailer Bumper Pull Weights

When I started looking at horse trailers, I spent a LOT of time looking into single horse options. After all, I only have one horse, and I was hesitant to invest a ton of money into something I wouldn’t use that often anyway.

But, I soon discovered that you won’t save that much weight or money with a one-horse trailer.

In fact, you’ll have less of an aftermarket if you want to resell it, you can’t take friend’s horses along anywhere, and there can be serious concerns around maneuverability of a small skinny trailer on the road. (Think wind storm!)

There are a few one-horse models out there, however, if this is your cup of tea. The EquiSpirit Solemate was my frontrunner if I hadn’t decided to get a two-horse.

Brand/Model GVWR (lbs) Curb Weight (lbs) Other Info
4-Start 1 Horse Model 5,200 lb Torsion Axle w/ Electric Brakes
Equispirit Solemate 2,780 (without options) Axle: 7,000 lbs.
Double-D 1 Horse BP 2,700 (without options)

2-Horse Trailer Bumper Pull Weights

Brand/Model GVWR (lbs) Curb Weight (lbs) Other Info
Logan Coach 2H Crossfire 7,000 2,540 5,200 lb Torsion Axle w/ Electric Brakes
Charmac Outlaw 2H 7,000  –  Axle: 3,500 lbs
Featherlite 9651  –  2,700 Two 3,500 lbs axles
Featherlite 9652  –  2,700 Axles: 2 x 3,500 lbs
Exiss Express BP SS Edition 7,000 2,620 Axles: 2 x 3,500 lbs
Adam Ju-Lite 710AF 2H Straight Load 2,850 Axles: 2 x 3,500 lbs
Adam 710AF-WB 2H Slant Load + Dressing Room 3,680 Axles: 2 x 3,500 lbs
Exiss 7200 ST 9,995 4,020 Axles: 2 x 5,200 lbs
4-Star 2 Horse BP Thoroughbred  –   –  Axles: 2 x 3,500 lbs
EquiSpirit Dressing Room  –  3,200 Axles: 2 x 7,000 lbs
Sundowner Charter 2H TR SE Limited Edition Straight Load 8,050 2,915 Axles: 3,500 lbs
Sundowner Charter TR SE 2H Straight Load 8,050 3,280 Axles: 3,500 lbs
Sundowner Super Sport 2H Slant Load  8,050 2,435 Axles: 3,500 lbs
Trails West Adventure MX  –  2,920 Axles: 3,500 lbs
Trails West Royale  –  3,280 Axles: 3,500 lbs

3-Horse Trailer Bumper Pull Weights

Brand/Model GVWR (lbs) Curb Weight (lbs) Other Info
Logan Coach 3H Crossfire BH 7,000 2,920 Tongue Weight: 440 lbs
Sundowner Sportman XL 3H Slant Load 11,960 3,720 Axle: 5,200 lbs
Sundowner Sportman 3H Slant Load 9,990 3,480 Axle: 5,200 lbs
Trails West Adventure MX 10,000 2,850
Charmac Outlaw 9,990  –  Axle: 5,200 lbs
Featherlite 9409  –   3,600 (2″DR) 
Trails West Adventure MX  –  3,660 Axle: 5,200 lbs
Exiss Express BP SS Edition 7,000 3,100 Axles: 2 x 3,500 lbs
Trails West Sierra Select  –  3,960 Axle: 6,000 lbs

Return to top

online horse courses

Gooseneck Horse Trailer Weight

If a gooseneck trailer seems more to your liking, here’s a basic look at curbs weights in this category from Double-D Trailers. Again, numbers can vary significantly by brands and models.

  • 2 Horse Gooseneck (4,600 lbs)
  • 3 Horse Gooseneck (5,300 lbs)
  • 4 Horse Gooseneck (6,300 lbs)

DISCLAIMER: The information below comes from manufacturer websites, and you’ll see not all of them list each number. Contact them directly to fill in the gaps if you need additional data. Also remember these numbers may change as they come out with new models or make improvements. Check with them to ensure you have the latest figures.

1-Horse Trailer Gooseneck Weights

Brand/Model GVWR (lbs) Curb Weight (lbs) Other Info
EquiSpirit Solemate2,780 (without options)  –  2,850 Axle: 7,000 lbs

2-Horse Trailer Gooseneck Weights

Brand/Model GVWR (lbs) Curb Weight (lbs) Other Info
Trails West Adventure 2H 3,980 Axle: 3,500 lbs
Trails West Adventure MX 2H 3,900 Axle: 3,500 lbs
Sundowner Rancher Special 2H Slant Load 8,750 3,285
Sundowner Charter TR SE 2H Straight Load 8,750 3,440 Axle: 3,500 lbs
Trails West Classic 2H 4,131 Axle: 3,500 lbs
Trails West Sierra 2H 4,131 Axle: 3,500 lbs
Charmac Outlaw 2H 12,000 Axle: 6,000 lbs
Featherlite 8413 Combo 3,700
Exiss 7200 SR (2+1) 12,000 4,700 Axles: 2 x 6,000 lbs
Double-D Straight Load Dressing Room 4,100 Can be towed with most any 1500 series half-ton pickup

3-Horse Trailer Gooseneck Weights

Brand/Model GVWR (lbs) Curb Weight (lbs) Other Info
Logan Coach Crossfire 12,000 3,960 Tongue Weight – 920 lbs
Sundowner Sportman XL 3H Slant Load 9,900 4,420 Axle: 5,200 lbs
Charmac 3H Outlaw 17′ 12,000 5,675 Axle: 6,000 lbs
Trails West Adventure 3H 4,560 Axle: 5,200 lbs
Trails West Adventure MX 3H 4,420 Axle: 5,200 lbs
Trails West Classic 3H 4,563 Axle: 6,000 lbs
Trails West Sierra 3H 4,563 Axle: 6,000 lbs
Featherlite 8413 Combo (8’w) 4,300 Axles: 2 x 6,000 lbs
Exiss Express CX 10,400 4,200 Axles: 2 x 5,200 lbs
EquiSpirit Equibreeze Saferide 5,420 Axles: 2 x 12,000 lbs

4-Horse Trailer Gooseneck Weights

Brand/Model GVWR (lbs) Curb Weight (lbs) Other Info
Logan Coach Crossfire 4,720 Tongue Weight: 1,090 lbs
Trails West 4H Classic 12,000 5,600 Axle: 6,000 lbs
Trails West Adventure 4H 5,160 Axle: 5,200 lbs
Sundowner Super Sport 4H Slant Load 13,000 5,100
Trails West Adventure MX 4H 4,940 Axle: 5,200 lbs
Trails West Sierra 4H 5,049 Axle: 6,000 lbs
Featherlite 8413 Combo (7’w) 5,400
Exiss Express CX 10,400 4,220 Axles: 2 x 5,200 lbs
4-Star 4 Horse Model Axles: 2 x 7,000 lbs
EquiSpirit 4H Head to Head 8,400 (without options) Axles: 2 x 6,000 lbs
online horse courses

Bigger Horse Trailer Gooseneck Weights

Brand/Model GVWR (lbs) Curb Weight (lbs) Other Info
Trails West Classic 5H 5,562 Axle: 7,000 lbs
Trails West Classic 6H 6,030 Axle: 7,000 lbs
Trails West Sierra 5H 5,562 Axle: 7,000 lbs
Trails West Sierra 6H 6,030 Axle: 7,000 lbs
Sundowner Super Tack SS 6H Slant Load 15,210 6,240 Axle: 7,000 lbs
Featherlite 8541 5H (52″DR) 6,150
Featherlite 8541 6H (52″DR) 6,650
Exiss 7400 4H 10,400 4,940 Axles: 2 x 5,200 lbs
Exiss 7600 6H 10,400 5,700 Axles: 2 x 7,000 lbs

Return to top

Stock Trailer Weight

Remember that stock trailers tend to be steel and can be bumper pull or gooseneck.

DISCLAIMER: The information below comes from manufacturer websites, and you’ll see not all of them list each number. Contact them directly to fill in the gaps if you need additional data. Also remember these numbers may change as they come out with new models or make improvements. Check with them to ensure you have the latest figures.

Stock Trailer Weights

Brand/Model GVWR (lbs) Curb Weight (lbs) Other Info
Adam Overniter B62-10 6×10 2,200 Axle: 3,500 lbs
Trails West Hotshot BP 14′ 3,200 Axle: 3,500 lbs
Trails West Hotshot BP 17′ 3,500 Axle: 5,200 lbs
Adam Easy Hauler JGA 247 24ft. Aluminum 4,152 Axle: 7,000 lbs
Trails West Hotshot GN 16′ 4,220 Axle: 6,000 lbs
Trails West Hotshot GN 20′ 4,990 Axle: 7,000 lbs
Trails West Hotshot GN 24′ 5,390 Axles: 2 x 7,000 lbs
Exiss STC 16′ 14,000 4,100/4,200  Axles: 2 x 7,000 lbs
Exiss STC 20′ 14,000 4,380 Axles: 2 x 7,000 lbs
Exiss STC 30′ 14,000 5,300 Axles: 2 x 8,000 lbs

Return to top

New to hauling? Learn how in our blog You CAN Do This: Trailering a Horse for the First Time.

Adding Living Quarters

One of the biggest variables when it comes to weight is whether or not your trailer will have living quarters. Think of this like an RV living space within your trailer with sleeping space, a small kitchen, and a bathroom. (Yes, a bathroom!)

The upsides are obvious, but the downsides are added weight and cost.

Here are some loose figures from Double-D Trailers for how living quarters impact weight:

  • 2 Horse Gooseneck 6′ short wall (6,300 lbs), 8′ short wall (7,300 lbs)
  • 3 Horse Gooseneck 8′ short wall (7,900 lbs), 10′ short wall (8,900 lbs)
  • For each additional horse stall add 240lbs approximately.
  • For each 1′ of living quarters, add 500 lbs approximately.
  • If your trailer is a full 8′ wide, add another 1,000 lbs.

Return to top

Other Factors Impacting Horse Trailer Weight

horse trailer tack room

Don’t forget that what you store inside your trailer adds weight.

Living quarters aren’t the only factors that impact the weight and towing behavior of your horse trailer. Here are a few others to consider:

  • Ramps
  • Construction material
  • Tack room
  • Mats
  • Spare tires
  • Hauling terrain
  • Awnings
  • Tack and equipment
  • Feed
  • Number and size of horses

Check out our beginners guide to Trailering a Horse for the First Time (without having a full-blown panic attack).

Return to top

online horse courses

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What does GVWR mean on a horse trailer?

The Gross Vehicle Weight Rating should be listed on your vehicle title and on the actual trailer (usually on a sticker inside the door frame). This is the most your loaded trailer can weigh and still be towed safely.

According to EquiSpirit, GVWR = both axle weight ratings + tongue weight.

Q: Can an SUV pull a horse trailer?

There are some Suburban-esque and sport utility vehicles that may be able to handle a smaller bumper pull, but DO YOUR HOMEWORK.

Oftentimes factory installed hitches may need stabilizer bars in order to pull a trailer, and an auto/manual transmission can impact tow capabilities too.

Q: How much does a 4 horse trailer weigh?

The average 4-horse gooseneck trailer is around 4,200-8,400 pounds (curb weight).

Q: How much does a 3 horse trailer weigh?

The average 3-horse bumper pull trailer is around 2,800-3,900 pounds (curb weight).The average 3-horse gooseneck trailer is around 4,000-5,600 pounds (curb weight).

online horse courses

Q: How much does a 2 horse trailer weigh?

The average 2-horse bumper pull trailer is around 2,400-3,200 pounds (curb weight).

The average 2-horse gooseneck trailer is around 3,700-4,700 pounds (curb weight).

Q: How much does a 1 horse trailer weigh?

The average single horse bumper pull trailer is around 2,700 pounds (curb weight).

The average single horse gooseneck trailer is around 2,800 pounds (curb weight).

Q: What is the average Featherlite horse trailer weight?

The average Featherlite trailer weights between 2,700-5,600 pounds.

Check with the manufacturer on specific models and options.

Q: What is the best lightweight single horse trailer?

The EquiSpirit Solemate is the best lightweight single horse trailer in my opinion.

I spent a lot of time researching these, and had I gone with a single horse option it would have been this.

According to their website:

“With our new “2 Minus 1” horse trailer design,” says Neva, it’s now possible to haul your one horse in a safe, comfortable trailer and have plenty of space for a dressing room and tack/feed storage. By utilizing the side space for storage and One Horse Gooseneck Trailer dressing area, a camper package or more elaborate living quarters is easily added without being longer than a standard two horse trailer with a dressing room. Add a gooseneck and you have a place to sleep in a trailer only 17-1/2 feet long.”

Q: What vehicle can pull a horse trailer?

It depends on your exact trailer and what you plan to put in it. Check out the Choosing a Tow Vehicle section above.

Generally, you’ll want to pull your horse trailer with a full-size pickup truck and not a sport utility vehicle.

online horse courses

Q: Can a Range Rover pull a horse trailer?

It depends on your exact trailer and what you plan to put in it. According to the Range Rover website, the 2019 model has a CGVWR of 14,484 pounds (loaded truck and trailer).

You’ll want to talk to Range Rover and your trailer dealer further.

Q: Can a Tacoma pull a horse trailer?

There are some Suburban-esque and sport utility vehicles that may be able to handle a smaller bumper pull, but DO YOUR HOMEWORK.

Oftentimes factory installed hitches may need stabilizer bars in order to pull a trailer, and an auto/manual transmission can impact tow capabilities, too.

Q: Can a Jeep Grand Cherokee tow a horse trailer?

There are some Suburban-esque and sport utility vehicles that may be able to handle a smaller bumper pull, but DO YOUR HOMEWORK.

Oftentimes factory installed hitches may need stabilizer bars in order to pull a trailer, and an auto/manual transmission can impact tow capabilities too.

Here is the towing capacity chart on the Jeep website

Q: Can a Dodge Ram 1500 pull a horse trailer?

It depends on your exact trailer and what you plan to put in it. Check the Payload and Towing Capacity listings here.

Q: What’s an average 3 horse slant trailer weight?

This varies based on your exact model, but 3 horse slant trailers typically weigh between 3,700 – 4,500 lbs (curb weight).

online horse courses

Q: What is the average Sundowner horse trailer weight?

Weight depends on the model (check tables above), but here are a few curb weight ranges for Sundowner horse trailers:

  • 2 Horse Bumper Pull (2,435+ lbs)
  • 3 Horse Bumper Pull (3,480+ lbs)
  • 2 Horse Gooseneck (3,285+ lbs)
  • 3 Horse Gooseneck (4,420+ lbs)
  • 4 Horse Gooseneck (5,100+ lbs)
  • 6 Horse Gooseneck (6,240+ lbs)

Q: What is the average Trails West horse trailer weight?

Weight depends on the model (check tables above), but here are a few curb weight ranges for Trails West horse trailers:

  • 2 Horse Bumper Pull (2,920+ lbs)
  • 3 Horse Bumper Pull (3,660+ lbs)
  • 2 Horse Gooseneck (3,900+ lbs)
  • 3 Horse Gooseneck (4,420+ lbs)
  • 4 Horse Gooseneck (5,562+ lbs)
  • 6 Horse Gooseneck (6,030+ lbs)

Q: What’s an average Adam horse slant trailer weight?

This will depend on your exact model, but a typical 2 horse slant Adam trailer is ~3,680 lbs (curb weight).

Q: What is the average horse trailer weight in kg?

  • 2 Horse without a dress (2,400+ lbs)
  • 2 Horse with a dressing room (3,200+ lbs)
  • 3 Horse with a dressing room (4,100+ lbs)
  • 2 Horse Gooseneck (4,600+ lbs)
  • 3 Horse Gooseneck (5,300+ lbs)
  • 4 Horse Gooseneck (6,300+ lbs)

Q: What are tow vehicle options for 2 horse bumper pull aluminum trailers?

It depends on your exact trailer and what you plan to put in it. Check out the Choosing a Tow Vehicle section above.

I pull my two-horse trailer with a full-size 4WD pickup truck (GMC Sierra 2500).

online horse courses

Q: What’s the minimum truck needed to pull a 2 horse trailer?

It depends on your exact trailer and what you plan to put in it. Check out the Choosing a Tow Vehicle section above.

I pull my two-horse trailer with a full-size 4WD pickup truck (GMC Sierra 2500).

Q: What are appropriate 2 horse trailers for a half ton truck?

You’re thinking about it backwards, as ideally you’ll decide on your trailer before your towing vehicle to ensure there’s a proper fit for your exact horse.

If you already have a truck, though, double-check the manufacturer towing capacity listings for more details.

Q: Do horse trailers need to stop at weigh stations?

It depends on your state. Check with the Department of Transportation for your state.

Per EquiSpirit, here is some general guidance:

“They may want to check vehicle registration, driver’s license, weight, or safety equipment and often they will want to see the health papers of the horses or do a brand inspection. Most of the time, the weigh station personnel will be too busy with big trucks to bother with you and they will probably wave you on… Any sign that says “Vehicles with Trailers” or with “Livestock” means you must pull in. In this case, they will want to inspect the horses. If you do not stop, they may pursue you and bring you back. The fines can be very steep.”

Q: How do I pick the right trailer size?

You’ve come to the right place! Read this article from the top for guidance about how to pick the right trailer size.

Remember to start with the horse in mind FIRST.

Quick note: If you have any of the horses listed in our Elevate Your Ride With These 6 Tall Horse Breeds article, you’ll want to look for trailers with extra height!

Return to top

Whew! What a Load Off

Having now owned my truck and trailer for two years, I can say that all the hard work researching up front and making sure your rig is properly “formulated” is worth it.

horse-trailer-weight-ready

With the right pieces in place, you’ll set yourself up for safe trailering!

My horse is safe and comfortable, my truck handles the load easily and efficiently, and everyone else on the road with me is safer because of my diligence about horse trailer weight.

Happy trails, and happy shopping!

P.S. Enjoy this article? Trot on over to:

Love it? Share it!

About the author

Horse Rookie

I began riding horses at age six, and I'm just as infatuated (OK, more!) with the sport decades later. My AQHA gelding exemplifies the versatility of the breed -- reined cow horse, reining, roping, ranch riding, trail, dressage, and jumping. We're also dipping our toes (hooves) into Working Equitation!